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Teach Through Games: Crazy Cereal

Teach Through Games: Crazy Cereal

Posted by Sam Blanco on Jul 3, 2015

A unique electronic game that gets kids excited about colors

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Teach Through Games: Jump 246!

Teach Through Games: Jump 246!

Posted by Sam Blanco on Jun 30, 2015

A rummy-style game that practices skip-counting.

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Great Games Giveaway

Great Games Giveaway

Posted by Sam Blanco on Jun 29, 2015

After a rainy weekend, I got to thinking it was time to give away a few more games. There are lots of ways to enter for a chance to win over $50 worth of games for preschool and early elementary students! a Rafflecopter...

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Teach Through Games: Share a Berry

Teach Through Games: Share a Berry

Posted by Sam Blanco on Jun 28, 2015

A great preschool game that works on simple math, sharing, and recognizing left and right.

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Teach Through Games: Thumbs Up

Teach Through Games: Thumbs Up

Posted by Sam Blanco on Jun 23, 2015

Can you scoop the loops faster than everyone else?

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Teach Through Games: The Tower

Teach Through Games: The Tower

Posted by Sam Blanco on May 31, 2015

Age level: Upper Elementary Description: The Tower is a simple game that gets kids competing to be the fastest to match a color sequence. This two player game is speedy and fun. Skills & Modifications: While The Tower is a simple game, it provides opportunities to work on a broad range of skills. I’ve included some modifications that pertain to specific skills below. Scanning – The Tower requires players to engage in higher order scanning skills because they must not only look at the face-up side of the blocks, but turn them over to find specific colors. For learners who have mastered basic scanning skills, this is a great way to take those skills to a higher level. Sequencing – At its root, this game is all about sequencing. Once The Tower is turned over and all 8 balls are visible, both players are quickly trying to replicate the sequence in the Tower. Some children with autism may struggle with sequencing skills. You may want to cover part of the tower so they have less visual information to attend to. One way you can do this is by simply placing an index card in front of the tower so that only the bottom ball is visible, then moving it up as the child finds corresponding blocks. You can quickly fade this by making two balls visible after the child has shown success, then three balls, etc. until the child is playing the game as designed. Color Recognition/Identification – A child doesn’t have to be able to identify colors in order to play this game, but they must be able to match. If the child...

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