ABA Bookshelf

ABA Bookshelf: From Emotions to Advocacy by Pam Wright & Pete Wright Comments Off on ABA Bookshelf: From Emotions to Advocacy by Pam Wright & Pete Wright

ABA Bookshelf: From Emotions to Advocacy by Pam Wright & Pete Wright

Posted by on Apr 20, 2014 in ABA Bookshelf

While this is not an ABA text, I have found this book from Wrightslaw to be an essential guide for parents who are grappling with the special education system for the first time. The book clearly outlines the rights afforded to individuals with disabilities in the United States. Chapter Two lays out the steps to creating a “Master Plan” for providing an appropriate education for your child. I’ve helped every family I’ve worked with put together the five elements of the master plan as described in the book. I’ve found that it helps parents to focus on essential needs and make decisions more easily and constructively. In a system that can be incredibly overwhelming for both parents and educators, it’s wonderful to be able to provide clear suggestions and expectations as parents navigate through the system. While I find Chapter Two to be valuable for parents who are new to the system or who have been involved with special education for many years, the book provides a wealth of additional information including a breakdown of different laws related to special education, organizing documents, and making the most of meetings. As I mentioned, this is not an ABA book, but it has been essential in my practice as an ABA...

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ABA Bookshelf: Activity Schedules for Children with Autism by Lynn E. McClannahan, PhD & Patricia J. Krantz, PhD 1

ABA Bookshelf: Activity Schedules for Children with Autism by Lynn E. McClannahan, PhD & Patricia J. Krantz, PhD

Posted by on Mar 2, 2014 in ABA Bookshelf

The subtitle for this book sums up its importance: Teaching Independent Behavior. While activity schedules are used widely in both homes and schools, my experience has been that any many situations they are not used as effectively as they could be.In this book, McClannahan and Krantz break down the important steps for introducing activity schedules to learners with autism to “teach them to initiate and complete activities and go on to the next activities without waiting for someone to give them directions.” One of the biggest takeaways from the book is that activity schedules are not just another program we introduce to teach to mastery. Instead they should evolve with the child, growing as the child’s skillset grows, and promote an ever-broader range of independent play, social, and daily living activities over time. This book describes in easy-to-follow steps exactly how to accomplish this. McClannahan and Krantz define an activity schedule as “a set of pictures or words that cues someone to engage in a sequence of activities.” Implementing this type of schedule is quite simple, but doing it well is much more challenging than it first appears, which is another reason this book is on the ABA Bookshelf. The book is well organized and clearly explains every level...

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